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Nolan's Free House, Nine Elms

Location:
Wilcox Road, Nine Elms, London
Client:
JV between The Nolan Group & SK London Construction
Status:
Planning
Photography by:
Stefan Shaw Studio

Located in the heart of Nine Elms, the constrained site sits directly above the tunnels of the Bakerloo Line Extension, occupying a prominent and highly visible location on the corner of Wilcox Road and Hartington Road.

Formed by a joint venture partnership of the Nolan Group and SK London Construction, the residential led building comprises 25 high quality units over nine floors, with leisure facilities and a ground floor re-provision of the well-established public house and restaurant at ground floor.

200m walking distance from the new Nine Elms tube station, the curved plan form is a direct response to the movement of people around the site, which is set to intensify as the station opened earlier in2021. The proposals overarching placemaking principles look toward strengthening connections across the wider area as part of the Vauxhall Nine Elms Battersea (VNEB) masterplan and public realm enhancements.

Responding the constraints of the tube tunnels below, the building employs a lightweight prefabricated steel frame construction methodology, and challenges peoples pre-conceived ideas about what modular constructed buildings look like.

Rooted in the history of the site, its textures, materials, colours and tonality, the glazed terracotta cladding gives the building a chameleonic appearance, ever-changing in different weather and lighting conditions. Conceived as a contemporary take on the glazed tiles of the original pub, the building draws on the historic use of greens and blues, to represent the green credentials of the buildings exceedingly high performing sustainability credentials both physically and metaphorically.

With generous lobbies and tactile materials, the buildings Terra-cotta tiles lend a strong vertical visual element to the building. Glazed for a dark green hue, the tiles form irregular waves around the building’s façade that break every so often to reveal balconies, full height windows or foliage.

Nolan's Free House, Nine Elms

Location:
Wilcox Road, Nine Elms, London
Client:
JV between The Nolan Group & SK London Construction
Status:
Planning
Photography by:
Stefan Shaw Studio

Located in the heart of Nine Elms, the constrained site sits directly above the tunnels of the Bakerloo Line Extension, occupying a prominent and highly visible location on the corner of Wilcox Road and Hartington Road.

Formed by a joint venture partnership of the Nolan Group and SK London Construction, the residential led building comprises 25 high quality units over nine floors, with leisure facilities and a ground floor re-provision of the well-established public house and restaurant at ground floor.

200m walking distance from the new Nine Elms tube station, the curved plan form is a direct response to the movement of people around the site, which is set to intensify as the station opened earlier in2021. The proposals overarching placemaking principles look toward strengthening connections across the wider area as part of the Vauxhall Nine Elms Battersea (VNEB) masterplan and public realm enhancements.

Responding the constraints of the tube tunnels below, the building employs a lightweight prefabricated steel frame construction methodology, and challenges peoples pre-conceived ideas about what modular constructed buildings look like.

Rooted in the history of the site, its textures, materials, colours and tonality, the glazed terracotta cladding gives the building a chameleonic appearance, ever-changing in different weather and lighting conditions. Conceived as a contemporary take on the glazed tiles of the original pub, the building draws on the historic use of greens and blues, to represent the green credentials of the buildings exceedingly high performing sustainability credentials both physically and metaphorically.

With generous lobbies and tactile materials, the buildings Terra-cotta tiles lend a strong vertical visual element to the building. Glazed for a dark green hue, the tiles form irregular waves around the building’s façade that break every so often to reveal balconies, full height windows or foliage.

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